Education

El Paso High School students may have to retake SATs after tests fly out of UPS truck

Students at a Texas high school may have to retake the SATs after test papers flew out of a UPS truck.

El Paso High School seniors were made aware of the situation earlier this week. All but 55 tests were recovered, the district told NBC affiliate KTSM-TV.

“El Paso ISD is working closely with the College Board to determine a remedy for the El Paso High School students whose SAT exams were lost in transit after they were securely submitted to UPS,” spokesperson Liza Rodriguez said.

The tests affected were taken on Oct. 27 at the school.

College Board, the organization that administers standardized tests like the SAT and PSAT, said exams are “occasionally” lost in transit.

“When such instances occur, we work with the school to ensure that students are able to retest as soon as possible,” the organization told the news station. “We are currently working with El Paso High School to provide options for the impacted students.”

The district said counselors will be providing students who want to take the ACT with a waiver that allows them to retake the test at no cost.

Student Body President Zyenna Martinez told KTSM that she is more concerned about the personal information on the missing tests.

“On the test score sheets, we have all of our information and identification on the score — our location where we live, our address, our date of birth, all of our information. And it stinks because our identity is out there right now. Some people could have picked up some flyers,” she said.

It’s not clear how the tests came loose. UPS apologized and said employees are still trying to recover as many missing exams as possible.

“We will work with the school to resolve the situation. The driver’s actions in this case are not representative of UPS protocols and methods, and we are addressing this with him. Safely meeting our service commitments is UPS’s first priority,” a spokesperson said in an emailed statement on Saturday.

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